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Engagement Activities

Blog post by Rachel MacGregor (Digital Archivist) following the “Archives, Access and AI” conference 

Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel 

Part Of Official Scheme? 

No

Geographic Reach 

International

Primary Audience 

Professional Practitioners 

Results and Impact 

Rachel MacGregor (Digital Archivist) wrote this blog post following the “Archives, Access and AI” conference. She noted: “I thought this was a fascinating and thought provoking conference and I am still thinking about many of the themes which came up in it and hope to draw on in my practice. many thanks to Dr Lise Jaillant for all her hard work in putting this together.” See also her tweet and conference activity on Twitter – #ArAcAi

Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 

2020

URL

https://anoldhanddigital.wordpress.com/2020/02/06/archives-access-and-ai/

Blog post by William Kilbride (Executive Director, Digital Preservation Coalition) following the “Archives, Access and AI” conference 

Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel 

Part Of Official Scheme? 

No

Geographic Reach 

International

Primary Audience 

Professional Practitioners 

Results and Impact 

William Kilbride (Executive Director, Digital Preservation Coalition) wrote this blog post following the “Archives, Access and AI” conference. A not-for-profit membership organization, the DPC was founded in 2002, and now gathers 100 agencies from 13 countries. 

William Kilbride noted: “The blog post that I produced as a follow up has been popular, with 1250 views making it the most read blog of 2020 so far (the average for 2020 so far is 525 views). The blog would not have been written if I had not been challenged to do so in the context of your project. The DPC blog is mostly provided as a forum for debate and discussion among DPC members to whom it is actively promoted, including archivists, records managers, information architects and senior leaders in the IT sector. Thinking about the diverse contexts of the DPC membership in academic institutions but also in government industry and regulatory bodies. I would suggest this will have created an impact for your project in sectors and geographies that would not typically be able to engage with research of this kind.” 

Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 

2020

URL

https://www.dpconline.org/blog/nothing-about-us-without-us

Exhibition at the John Rylands Library (Manchester) to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Carcanet Press 

Participation in an activity, workshop or similar 

Part Of Official Scheme? 

No

Geographic Reach 

International

Primary Audience 

Public/other audiences 

Results and Impact 

Over 250,000 people visit and engage with the John Rylands Library each year. Among these international visitors, many have had an opportunity to see the Carcanet exhibition, which opened in October 2019. The exhibition explores three themes: Carcanet’s relationship with Arts Council England, its place within the broader UK poetry publishing landscape, and its role in publishing the work of female poets including Elizabeth Jennings and Sujata Bhatt. The exhibition was in the Rylands Gallery until March 2020. 

Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 

2019, 2020

URL

https://www.lboro.ac.uk/news-events/news/2019/october/carcanet-press-exhibition/

International Conference “Archives, Access and AI” 

Participation in an activity, workshop or similar 

Part Of Official Scheme? 

No

Geographic Reach 

International

Primary Audience 

Professional Practitioners 

Results and Impact 

The “Archives, Access and AI” international conference was attended by 56 people including a majority (59%) of archivists/ librarians/ museums professionals, as well as policy makers and academics. It led to active engagement on Twitter (#ArAcAi) and blogs.  

We circulated a survey immediately after the conference. Among the best things about the conference, respondents cited  

  1. The range & quality of speakers & papers (‘Wide range of speakers – interdisciplinary aspect’; ‘The range and quality of the speakers’);  
  2. The discussion opportunities (‘The possibility of discussing the themes during the sessions and after’; ‘Discussions with range of participants’);  
  3. The networking opportunities (‘Good opportunity to speak to others about their work and experiences in related areas’; ‘The opportunity to share ideas’);  
  4. The learning opportunities (‘Good balance of theory, with practical concrete experience with organisations, institutions and software/hardware initiatives’; ‘Learning about the variety of problems people deal with’);  
  5. The pace of the event (‘Enough time for questions after sessions, for wider engagement and perspective sharing’; ‘Pacing of the talks over the three days’). 

Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 

2020

URL

https://www.poetrysurvival.com/blog/

Workshop “Carcanet approaching 50: Poetry Publishers, Archives and the Digital Revolution” 

Participation in an activity, workshop or similar 

Part Of Official Scheme? 

No

Geographic Reach 

National

Primary Audience 

Public/other audiences 

Results and Impact 

Coinciding with the fiftieth anniversary of Carcanet, the workshop offered unique insight into a publishing house central to the contemporary literary landscape. More generally, it asked how independent poetry publishers can compete against multinational publishing firms in an increasingly concentrated economy. The workshop brought together publishing industry professionals, biographers, creative writers and poetry readers (total of 35 participants). 
 
Attendees included academics and non-academics including: 

  • Michael Schmidt (founder of Carcanet Press). 
  • Distinguished poets and writers including Grevel Lindop; Roger Garfitt; John Mcauliffe; Matthew Welton; Robert Hampson; Jon Glover; Rebecca Goss; Alex Wong 
  • Editors and publishing professionals: Judith Willson; Helen Tookey 
  • Archivists, librarians and museums professionals: James Peters and Jane Gallagher (John Rylands Library); Rachel Foss (British Library); Richard Temple (Senate House Library, London)

Following the workshop, we circulated a survey. 75% of respondents found the workshop “very useful” and 25% found it “useful.”

All the respondents found the workshop “well organised.” 

Respondents praised the high quality of presentations and the diversity of the programme (with many sessions led by poets and publishing professionals): 

“Consistently very high quality of contributions” 

“Great line of speakers – including writers, publishers, editors, critics, curators” 

“Best thing: roundtable with Grevel Lindop, Roger Garfitt, Michael Schmidt and Judith Willson” 

“Good variety of speakers” 

The workshop resulted in further oral history interviews that are now available on the project digital resource. 

Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 

2019

URL

https://www.poetrysurvival.com/blog/